Top Complete List Of Jane Austen Books – Favorite Reading 2022

Top Complete List Of Jane Austen Books - Favorite Reading

As one of the most prolific writers in history, Jane Austen’s work has been celebrated for centuries. While Austen is best known for her novels, she also wrote a number of other works, including poetry, plays, and essays.

If you’re looking for your next favorite book, look no further than this list of Jane Austen’s greatest works. From classics like Pride and Prejudice to lesser-known gems like Mansfield Park, there’s something for everyone on this list.

About Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, England, to Cassandra and George Austen. She was their second daughter and seventh child. Cassandra, her older sister, with whom she cooperated in her final years as a writer, was extremely close to her.

When Jane and her sister were sent to boarding institutions throughout their pre-adolescent years, they received some formal schooling. Unfortunately, due to financial difficulties, their schooling was cut short. The Typhus sickness struck both Austen sisters at this time, but they recovered.

Austen grew up listening to and writing tales, which inspired her to pursue a writing profession. She began writing her own books in the 1790s. Her first was Love and Friendship, a satire of romantic literature organized as a series of love letters.

The History of England, a satire of historical literature, was published the following year. Austen’s Juvenilia is given to these journals, which comprise poetry, dramas, and short tales.

In her old years, Austen continued to write. Sense and Sensibility were first composed as a sequence of letters and then published as Elinor and Marianne. Jane Austen’s written versions of First Impressions became Pride and Prejudice. Susan was renamed and published as Northanger Abbey after her death by Jane’s brother, Henry.

Jane Austen was never married, and she had Addison’s illness at 41 in 1816. However, it was never established that Austen was suffering from such a condition.

Austen continued to work as much as she could despite her sickness. She even managed to create a new book, The Brothers, which was republished as Sanditon after her death. Her health worsened over time, and she died at Winchester, Hampshire, England, on July 18, 1817.

books by jane austen in order

How Many Books Did Jane Austen Write?

Jane Austen penned six books that are still enthralling readers over 200 years after her death:

  1. Sense and Sensibility
  2. Pride and Prejudice
  3. Mansfield Park
  4. Emma
  5. Northanger Abbey
  6. Persuasion

Many current print and electronic copies of these books, as well as her juvenilia and unfinished works, are available. Jane Austen’s Letters, edited by Deirdre Le Faye, contains her collected letters, which are also a source of amusement and biographical information (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Complete List Of Jane Austen Books – 28 Books

Love and Freindship – 1790

Love and Freindship - jane austen book order

Lady Susan, the inspiration for Whit Stillman’s feature film Love and Friendship, starring Kate Beckinsale and Chloe Sevigny, is now gathered in one lovely clothbound book, replete with Austen’s charmingly eccentric spelling habits.

Jane Austen began writing when she was eleven, and her early work already has the markers of her later work. But it’s also a product of her time—dark, bizarre, and often startlingly bawdy, and a long cry from the polished, dazzling books of manners for which she became renowned.

These extremely lively poems depict drunken heroines, infants who bite off their mother’s fingers, and a letter-writer who has killed her whole family. Austen’s juvenilia is included in this book, including her “History of England” and the novella Lady Susan, in which the anti-heroine sneaks and cheats her way through high society.

This is a must-have for every Austen fan, with a title that retains a young Austen’s original unique spelling habits and an introduction by Christine Alexander that reveals how Austen was self-consciously fashioning herself as a writer from an early age.

Lesley Castle – 1793

Jane Austen’s novella “Lesley Castle” was incomplete at the time of her death. It recounts the talks and reflections of Miss Margaret Lesley and Miss Charlotte Lutterell via a series of letters.

As they discuss topics like infidelity, elopement, divorce, and remarriage, it becomes evident that they are shallow, inconsequential women who are perfect targets for Jane Austen’s witty social satire. This book, written when Austen was barely 14 years old, has all of Austen’s original spelling idiosyncrasies.

Jane Austen (1775–1817) was an English novelist best known for her works criticizing the upper classes of the 18th century and current novels of Sensibility. Her use of sarcasm and cutting social satire and realism has earned her widespread respect from academics and critics, with her work influencing the shift to 19th-century literary realism.

“Sense and Sensibility” (1811), “Pride and Prejudice” (1813), and “Mansfield Park” are among the author’s other significant works (1814). Many old books, like this one, are becoming rare and pricey. We’re reissuing this book in a more inexpensive, contemporary, and high-quality version, along with a newly commissioned author biography.

The Beautifull Cassandra – 1793

One of Jane Austen’s most endearing little “novels”-in-miniature, now available in a deluxe illustrated version sure to please Austen admirers everywhere.

The majority of people believe Jane Austen only authored six books. Fortunately for us, she penned a few more when she was still a little girl, albeit they were all relatively brief. When Jane Austen wrote The Beautifull Cassandra, an irreverent and funny little gem, she was twelve or thirteen years old.

It’s a complete and flawless novel-in-miniature, weighing in at 465 words and comprising of dedication to her elder sister Cassandra and twelve chapters, each consisting of a line or two.

The Beautifull Cassandra follows the slightly criminal exploits of the sixteen-year-old title character, who, after stealing a hat, leaves her mother’s shop to frolic around London, eating ice cream (without paying), taking coach rides (without paying), and encountering handsome young ladies and gentlemen (without speaking) all to return home hours later with whispered joy: “This is a day well spent.”

This delightful book is edited by famous Austen expert Claudia L. Johnson. It incorporates gorgeous and edgy watercolor paintings by Leon Steinmetz.

The Beautifull Cassandra, Johnson writes in her illuminating afterword, is “among the most brilliant and polished” of Austen’s youthful writings—a precocious work written for her family’s amusement but already foreshadowing her mature irony, sense of the absurd, gift for parody, and, above all, stylistic mastery.

The end product is a stunning edition of a literary classic that is likely to please.

The Watsons – 1805

Jane Austen’s works have been praised by reviewers and researched by academics because of their appeal to readers. The author’s humorous and perceptive insights lift her stories of parties, gossip, and romance into compelling drama, painting a vivid picture of daily life in Regency England’s cities and countryside.

Austen’s life was cut short when she died at forty-two, but her fans have anxiously read and re-read her few works. This collection includes two of Austen’s unfinished books, which are sometimes neglected jewels that add to our understanding of her narrative abilities.

Austen’s nephew incorporated the lines in an 1871 biography of his famous uncle, and they first appeared posthumously. The Watsons takes place in a traditional household setting, where a lively heroine’s marital prospects are limited by poverty and pride.

Sanditon, on the other hand, travels into unfamiliar ground. It is set in a seaside resort with a cast of hypochondriacs and speculators, suggesting that Austen’s writing may have gone new paths.

These fragmentary tales would have been fascinating as academic records and oddities even if they had little inherent worth. They are, as it happens, of excellent quality and worthy of reading for joy and learning.

Sense and Sensibility – 1811

Sense and Sensibility - order of jane austen books

Jane Austen’s book Sense and Sensibility was her first published work, appearing in 1811 under the pseudonym “A Lady.” Sense and Sensibility is a work of romantic fiction, best known as a comedy of manners, set in southwest England, London, and Kent between 1792 and 1797, and depicts the lives and loves of the Dashwood sisters Elinor and Marianne.

The young girls are followed to their new home, a little cottage on the property of a distant cousin, where they experience love, passion, and heartache. The novel’s philosophical conclusion is ambiguous: the reader must determine whether or not sense and Sensibility have genuinely blended.

Pride and Prejudice – 1813

The captivating tale of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy is told in Jane Austen’s most beloved book. PBS’s The Great American Read named it one of America’s best-loved books.

In Jane Austen’s renowned novel Pride and Prejudice, few people haven’t been enchanted by Elizabeth Bennet’s clever and independent attitude. When Elizabeth Bennet meets attractive bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy for the first time, she finds him arrogant; he is unconcerned with her beautiful looks and lively intellect.

She is determined to loathe Darcy, even more when she learns that he is implicated in the unhappy relationship between his buddy Bingley and her adored sister Jane. Jane Austen shows us the fallacy of judging on first appearances in the dazzling comedy of manners that follows and brilliantly captures the friendships, gossip, and snobberies of provincial middle-class life.

Based on Austen’s first edition, this Penguin Classics version includes Tony Tanner’s original Penguin Classics introduction and a revised introduction and comments by Viven Jones.

Penguin has been the dominant publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world for almost seventy years.

Penguin Classics provides a worldwide library of the finest writings throughout history, spanning genres and disciplines, with over 1,700 volumes. Readers rely on the series to provide authoritative texts with introductions, comments from renowned academics and modern writers, and up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Pride and Prejudice: A Coloring Classic – 1813

This fantastic coloring book has gorgeously elaborate patterns and details, famous phrases, and iconic scenes to color in, allowing you to fall in love with Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice all over again. An interesting reference to the Victorian language of flowers is included, as well as a beautiful foiled cover.

Mansfield Park – 1814

Fanny Price is taken from the squalor of her parents’ home in Portsmouth and raised at Mansfield Park with her wealthy relatives, painfully conscious of her low status and her cousin Edmund as her only ally. The Crawfords move into the neighborhood while her uncle is away in Antigua, bringing with them the glitz of London life and a wild desire for flirting.

With its calm protagonist and nuanced analysis of the social status and moral integrity, Mansfield Park is considered Jane Austen’s first mature work and one of her most deeply.

Penguin has been the dominant publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world for almost seventy years.

Penguin Classics provides a worldwide library of the finest writings throughout history, spanning genres and disciplines, with over 1,700 volumes. Readers rely on the series to provide authoritative texts with introductions, comments from renowned academics and modern writers, and up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Emma (Collins Classics) – 1815

HarperCollins is pleased to showcase its collection of best-selling, timeless classics.

‘The actual ills of Emma’s condition were her ability to have a little too much of her own way and a tendency to think a little too highly of herself…’

Emma Woodhouse is a beautiful, wealthy, self-assured, witty matchmaker who seems unconcerned about her personal life.

Emma takes Harriet Smith under her wing and sets her sights on finding her a suitable mate. Mr. Knightley chastises Emma for her follies, but only when Harriet begins to follow her own love interests does Emma realize the true depths of her heart.

Emma is undoubtedly Austen’s most well-loved social comedy since it is delightful, engaging, and amusing, with a sparkling array of characters.

Emma (Collins Classics) – 1817

Jane Austen’s last novel was adapted by noted screenwriter Andrew Davies for a PBS limited series. Sanditon is a lovely supplement to Jane Austen’s books about England’s wealthy classes and the deceit, snobbery, and surprising romances in their society. It is an eleven-chapter fragment left after Jane Austen’s death and finished by an Austen enthusiast and author.

Charlotte Heywood is introduced to a full range of polite society when she accepts an invitation to visit the newly fashionable seaside resort of Sanditon, from reigning local dowager Lady Denham to her impoverished ward Clara and from the handsome, feckless Sidney Parker to his amusing if hypochondriac sisters.

Charlotte, a heroine whose clear-sighted common sense is sometimes at odds with romance, cannot help but see folly and love in many forms around her. Can Charlotte, on the other hand, keep her calm and reject her heart’s desires?

Northanger Abbey – 1817

Austen’s clever examination of the dangers of confusing fiction with reality.

Catherine Morland, a young, naive woman, discovers the pleasures of sophisticated society for the first time during an exciting season in Bath. Catherine is ecstatic to meet new people, including provocative Isabella, who shares Catherine’s love of Gothic romance and horror, and refined Henry and Eleanor Tilney, who invite her to their father’s enigmatic mansion Northanger Abbey.

Catherine imagines awful atrocities done by General Tilney there, her imagination informed by suspense and mystery literature. This is Jane Austen’s most young and cheerful novel, with its broad humor and irrepressible heroine.

Penguin has been the dominant publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world for almost seventy years. Penguin Classics provides a worldwide library of the finest writings throughout history, spanning genres and disciplines, with over 1,700 volumes.

Readers rely on the series to provide authoritative texts with introductions, comments from renowned academics and modern writers, and up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Persuasion – 1818

Jane Austen’s last work combines humorous social realism with a Cinderella love tale.

Anne Elliot, at the age of twenty-seven, is no longer a young woman with few love options. Lady Russell had convinced her to call off her engagement to Frederick Wentworth, a gorgeous naval lieutenant with neither wealth nor status, eight years before.

Jane Austen’s last finished work tells the story of what occurs when they reencounter one another. Persuasion is a magnificent satire of vanity and conceit set in the elegant circles of Lyme Regis and Bath. Still, it is, above all, a love tale laced with the grief of squandered possibilities.

Penguin has been the dominant publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world for almost seventy years. Penguin Classics provides a worldwide library of the finest writings throughout history, spanning genres and disciplines, with over 1,700 volumes.

Readers rely on the series to provide authoritative texts with introductions, comments from renowned academics and modern writers, and up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

The History of England – 1853

The History of England – 1853 - jane austen novels in order

Jane Austen’s book “The History of England” was published in 1791. It is a satirical parody of popular history books being used in schools, written when she was fifteen (and contains her original spelling peculiarities).

Within it, Austen mocks the historians’ questionable neutrality by hilariously mimicking the manner of writing typically in these publications. “The History of England,” with its outlandish characters and Austen’s usually keen wit, is a must-read for Austen fans and would be an excellent addition to any library.

Jane Austen (1775–1817) was an English novelist best known for her works criticizing the upper classes of the 18th century and current novels of Sensibility. Her use of sarcasm and cutting social satire and realism has earned her widespread respect from academics and critics, with her work influencing the shift to 19th-century literary realism.

“Sense and Sensibility” (1811), “Pride and Prejudice” (1813), and “Mansfield Park” are among the author’s other significant works (1814). Many old books, like this one, are becoming rare and pricey. We’re reissuing this book in a more inexpensive, contemporary, and high-quality version, along with a newly commissioned author biography.

Lady Susan – 1871

Lady Susan is a self-centered, lovely lady who wants to seduce the best spouse she can find while still dating a married guy. She defies all romance book conventions: she plays an active part, she’s not just attractive but also educated and funny, and her suitors are much younger than she is.

Lady Susan is treated considerably more gently than the adulteress in Mansfield Park, even though the finale provides a conventional prize for virtue.

Letters of Jane Austen – 1884

This fantastic book, first published in 1932, comprises a significant collection of letters written by the famed English novelist Jane Austen. Although these letters seem to be a series of chats about silk stockings, dinner menus, going to dances, and other minor topics, they provide readers with unique insights into the life and thinking of this brilliant author.

“The Letters of Jane Austen” is a must-read for anybody who has read and liked her novels, particularly those interested in learning more about Jane Austen’s daily life. Jane Austen (1775–1817) was an English novelist best known for her works criticizing the upper classes of the 18th century and current novels of Sensibility.

Her use of sarcasm and cutting social satire and realism has earned her widespread respect from academics and critics, with her work influencing the shift to 19th-century literary realism. “Sense and Sensibility” (1811), “Pride and Prejudice” (1813), and “Mansfield Park” are among the author’s other significant works (1814).

Many old books, like this one, are becoming rare and pricey. We’re reissuing this book in a more inexpensive, contemporary, and high-quality version, along with a newly commissioned author biography.

Jane Austen’s Letters to Her Sister Cassandra and Others – 1932

Letters to Jane Austen’s Sister Cassandra and Others

The Complete Works of Jane Austen – 1933

Jane Austen’s entire books, including “Sense and Sensibility,” “Persuasion,” “Pride and Prejudice,” “Emma,” and “Mansfield Park” are included in this download.

There are multiple tables of contents in this version, which have been adequately prepared. The names of all books featured in this volume are included in the first table of contents (at the beginning of the ebook).

By selecting one of those titles, you will be sent to the beginning of that work, where you will discover a new TOC listing all of the work’s chapters and sub-chapters.

My dear Cassandra – 1990

Jane Austen the lady and Jane Austen, the novelist, have been said to be one and the same and nowhere is this more clear to fans of her books than in the pages of her letters.

Portraits, facsimile letters, geographical engravings, and fashion plates are included in this fresh celebration of these letters, which strives to bring Jane Austen’s world to life.

The letters are organized around visual themes especially suited for illustration, such as the Hampshire countryside, social life in Bath and London, household occupations, making visitors, and traveling by carriage, even though the book follows a broadly chronological structure.

The author, born in Jane Austen’s Hampshire hamlet, gives Open University and Oxford University Department of External Studies English Literature courses. Her specialty is 19th-century children’s literature, which she has collected into an anthology called “Childhood.”

Catharine and Other Writings – 1993

This new annotated version of Jane Austen’s great short stories is the first of its kind. The texts were compared to the manuscripts, yielding a variety of fresh interpretations.

This collection, in addition to prose fiction and prayers, includes many of her poetry designed to amuse and soothe her friends, which are not accessible in any other book.

Description of the Series: For almost a century, Oxford World’s Classics has made the most comprehensive range of literature from throughout the world accessible.

Each cheap book shows Oxford’s dedication to scholarship, with authoritative introductions by top experts, essential notes to explain the text, up-to-date bibliographies for additional study, and much more.

The Wit and Wisdom of Jane Austen – 1996

One of the world’s most famous novelists, Jane Austen spoke some of the wisest and wittiest things ever uttered.

Her comments have never been presented in such a beautiful and considerate way as they are in this magnificent anthology. Each quip has been handpicked from Austen’s books and private correspondence and covers the timeless issues of happiness, family, fashion, beauty, human nature, society, and love and marriage.

More than fifty wonderful 1890s pictures from Jane’s writings compliment Jane’s words, making this the ideal gift for Janeites, budding authors, and anyone seeking humor and wisdom.

Favorite Jane Austen Novels – 1997

Three of the author’s most famous works praised for their satiric wit, subtlety, and style perfection brilliantly re-create the provincial world of the early nineteenth-century English countryside, focusing on husband-hunting mothers and daughters, the humbling of proud lovers, and the return of a once-rejected lover, respectively.

The Wild and Wanton Edition of Pride and Prejudice – 2010

The Wild and Wanton Edition of Pride and Prejudice -best books of jane austen

Crimson Romance’s new Wild and Wanton brand debuts with this edition of Pride and Prejudice: The Wild and Wanton Edition!

It is a well-accepted reality that a single guy who has considerable money must be without a wife in bed.

Until today, we’ve never been able to see Elizabeth and Fitzwilliam in flagrante delicto.

You may peep behind the closed doors of Pemberley’s hottest master bedroom – and luxuriate in the sexual joys of your favorite pair – in this wonderfully sexy update of the renowned classic.

This novel is every Austen fan’s fantasy come true, from the first kiss to the orgasmic conclusion the narrative you adore, with the passion ramped up to eleven. It should be no surprise that Mr. Darcy is just as passionate and fierce when his knickers are off as when they are on. And, let’s face it, we’ve all longed to see him without his knickers!

Sanditon, Lady Susan, & The History of England: The Juvenilia and Shorter Works of Jane Austen – 2011

Sanditon, Lady Susan, and the History of England: Jane Austen’s Juvenilia and Shorter Works is a rare compilation and a must-have for Jane Austen fans.

Part of the Macmillan Collector’s Library, a collection of beautiful pocket-sized classics with gold foiled borders and ribbon markers. These lovely books are ideal as presents or treats for book lovers.

Kathryn White contributes an introduction to this volume.

This book comprises not only Jane Austen’s amusing History of England, illustrated by her favorite sister Cassandra but also the unfinished Sanditon, the novel of her adulthood on which she was writing when she died at the age of forty-two, according to Richard Church.

‘The Watsons,’ ‘Catharine,’ ‘Lesley Castle,’ ‘Evelyn,’ ‘Frederic and Elfrida,’ ‘Jack and Alice,’ ‘Edgar and Emma,’ ‘Henry and Eliza,’ and ‘The Three Sisters’ are also featured, as are the two epistolary novels, Lady Susan and Love and Friendship [sic], and other, shorter works: ‘The Watson

Classics Reimagined, Pride and Prejudice – 2015

Experience this remarkable reworking of Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s classic tale of love and misunderstanding, now in paperback, with Alice Pattullo’s colorful and modern drawings.

Pride and Prejudice, one of Jane Austen’s most significant works, has endured the test of time. This famous novel is full of biting criticism, passion, and misunderstanding.

Mr. Bingley and his glum companion Mr. Darcy star in Pride and Prejudice, which recounts the love exploits of the Bennett sisters, Mr. Bingley, and his blue friend Mr. Darcy.

Pattullo’s full-color, folkloric, multi-faceted works of art infuse new life into this fascinating, romantic story, making it a must-have for book and art collectors both.

The Classics Reimagined series is a collection of spectacular collector’s editions of unabridged classic books that have been beautifully illustrated by modern artists from across the globe.

Each artist creates a one-of-a-kind graphic version of some of the most well-known, frequently read, and eagerly collected works by prominent writers.

Collect every gorgeous book, from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and from Edgar Allan Poe to the Brothers Grimm.

Pride and Prejudice & Emojis – 2017

Lizzie Bennet *heart eyes emoji* Mr. Darcy, Will she swipe right? Enjoy Austen’s razor-sharp humor and biting social satire, distilled and rendered in emoji’s lovely, contemporary language. Because there is no greater pleasure than reading. Except texting.

Pour Your Heart Out With Jane Austen – 2018

An interactive journal/quote book mash-up with lines from Regency writer Jane Austen’s most famous works and quirky artwork.

Pour Your Heart Out is a guided notebook, a quote book, and your new best friend all rolled into one. A wholly illustrated diary with inspirational passages from Jane Austen’s writings and creative exercises to inspire self-expression and creativity.

Readers are given a chance to let it all out on the page, explore their emotions, and use their imaginations. Pour Your Heart Out is an excellent book for teens and adults alike. Pour Your Heart Out will be there for you, whether you’re embarking on a new journey, coping with difficult situations, or crushing on your lab partner!

Jane Austen’s Little Book About Life – 2019

19th-century wisdom that has stood the test of time

Jane Austen’s books have enthralled readers for years with their astute observations on human nature. They include a wealth of practical insights and witty quips about relationships, religion, family, love, character, and virtue.

This lovely collection of quotations from the mouths of some of Jane’s most beloved characters and her own letters honors Jane’s wit and intelligence.

Rare images from the British Library, chosen Scripture passages, and personal prayers from the author are included in this beautifully designed book, making it a must-read for you or a thoughtful present for the Jane Austen fan in your life.

Terry Glaspey, a fellow Austenite and author of Jane Austen’s Prayers, will take you through some of Jane’s most memorable and thought-provoking phrases.

Jane Austen Miniature Library – 2019

Austen’s works are collected in a tiny, beautiful volume that looks great on your bookshelves.

This twelve-volume boxed collection includes all six of Jane Austen’s great books and looks fantastic on your bookcase.

When the spines are positioned in the correct sequence, they form a magnificent montage of a scene from eighteenth-century England, taken directly from the period in which Austen’s books are set. Each book is compact enough to carry you on the road while retaining the timeless appeal of Austen’s novels.

Some Best Jane Austen Quotes

Best Jane Austen Quotes

“I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.” – Pride & Prejudice

“There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.” –Northanger Abbey

“It isn’t what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.” –Sense & Sensibility

“Without music, life would be a blank to me.” — Emma

“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.” –Persuasion

“Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.” — Mansfield Park

“It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy; it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.” –Sense & Sensibility

“It is only a novel … or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language.” –Northanger Abbey

“Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.” –Pride & Prejudice

“Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.” –Emma

“Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.” –Pride & Prejudice

“The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.” — Pride and Prejudice

“I could no more write a romance than an epic poem. I could not sit seriously down to write a serious romance under any other motive than to save my life; and if it were indispensable for me to keep it up and never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter.

No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other.’” – Letter to Mr. Clarke

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